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  • Monday, February 04, 2013 2:43 PM | Deleted user
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    Executive Women International (EWI) of Chattanooga Reinforces Community Focus with $3,000 Scholarship to Southern Adventist University

    SAU scholarshipExecutive Women International (EWI) of Chattanooga recently donated $3,000 to Southern Adventist University. Since chartering in 1987, EWI of Chattanooga has contributed more than $170,000 to scholarship donations at area schools. The scholarships are specifically designated for single mothers.

    EWI of Chattanooga President Ani Yacoubian, of Yacoubian Tailors, says, "EWI representatives feel fortunate to have made a positive impact on their community through enriching the lives of local women."

    Connections, Careers and Community is the tagline of EWI, fulfilled through connection and promotion of member companies, career-enhancing professional development and community involvement. For more information about EWI or membership, please visit the chapter web site: ewichattanooga.org.

    Established in 1938, EWI® is a non-profit organization with more than 2,500 member firms and 2,800 representatives in major cities throughout the United States and Canada. EWI brings members together to promote member firms, to enhance personal and professional development, and to encourage community involvement. As a premier organization for networking and leadership development for today's business professionals, EWI offers professional development through webinars and its Academy of Leadership, as well as scholarships and philanthropic initiatives with a focus on literacy. For more information, visitewiconnect.com.


    Photo identification:
    Front Row:
    Megan Gray, SAU scholarship winner; Kathy Lee, Distefano Eye Center; Kristina Smith, First Tennessee Bank; Janelle Edmondson, SAU scholarship winner with son; Nancy Harrison, Spicer Rudstrom, PLLC
    Back Row:
    Gordon Bietz, SAU President; Bob Young, SAU Senior VP for Academic Administration; Christopher Carey, SAU VP for Advancement; Marc Grundy, SAU VP for Marketing and Enrollment Services; Emily Kurlinski, WSMC Classical 90.5; Bob Verrill, SAU Senior VP for Financial Administration
    Not pictured: Kim Miller, SAU scholarship winner
  • Monday, February 04, 2013 2:09 PM | Deleted user
    chattanoogan.com

    Executive Women International (EWI) of Chattanooga donated $3,000 to Southern Adventist University. Since chartering in 1987, EWI of Chattanooga has contributed more than $170,000 to scholarship donations at area schools. The scholarships are specifically designated for single mothers.

    EWI of Chattanooga President Ani Yacoubian, of Yacoubian Tailors, says, "EWI representatives feel fortunate to have made a positive impact on their community through enriching the lives of local women.

    Connections, Careers and Community is the tagline of EWI, fulfilled through connection and promotion of member companies, career-enhancing professional development and community involvement
  • Wednesday, November 07, 2012 4:04 PM | Kristina Smith (Administrator)
    Chattanoogan.com Tuesday, November 06, 2012
    Shown, from left to right, are John Delaney - UTC, Richard Brown – UTC, Catherine Cox, Lyndhurst Foundation, EWI, Chancellor Grady Bogue - UTC, Nancy Harrison, Spicer Rudstrom, PLLC, EWI, Laura Herron – UTC (in back), Ani Yacoubian, Yacoubian Tailors, EWI (in front), Terry Denniston – UTC, 
Barbara Verhine - UTC/EWI, Mary Tanner – UTC, Kristina Smith, First Tennessee Bank, EWI, Courtney Hoss – UTC, Deborah Arfken – UTC, Chuck Cantrell – UTC, Pat Branam – UTC, Kathy Lee, DiStefano Eye Center, EWI, Margaret Browning, Coca-Cola Bottling Company United, EWI
    Shown, from left to right, are John Delaney - UTC, Richard Brown – UTC, Catherine Cox, Lyndhurst Foundation, EWI, Chancellor Grady Bogue - UTC, Nancy Harrison, Spicer Rudstrom, PLLC, EWI, Laura Herron – UTC (in back), Ani Yacoubian, Yacoubian Tailors, EWI (in front), Terry Denniston – UTC, Barbara Verhine - UTC/EWI, Mary Tanner – UTC, Kristina Smith, First Tennessee Bank, EWI, Courtney Hoss – UTC, Deborah Arfken – UTC, Chuck Cantrell – UTC, Pat Branam – UTC, Kathy Lee, DiStefano Eye Center, EWI, Margaret Browning, Coca-Cola Bottling Company United, EWI

    Executive Women International (EWI) of Chattanooga continued a tradition started in 1996 by donating $12,000 to the Jean Bradford Memorial Endowment Fund at UTC. The endowment was established in memory of Jean Bradford, executive assistant to then UTC Chancellor, Dr. Frederick Obear.  Ms. Bradford, an EWI representative, passed away in 1995. EWI also contributed $6,000 to Chattanooga State. 

    EWI of Chattanooga President Ani Yacoubian, of Yacoubian Tailors, said, "EWI representatives feel fortunate to have made a positive impact on their community through enriching the lives of local women."

    Since chartering in 1987, EWI of Chattanooga has contributed more than $170,000 to scholarship donations at area schools.  The scholarships are specifically designated for single mothers.

    Connections, Careers and Community is the tagline of EWI, fulfilled through connection and promotion of member companies, career-enhancing professional development and community involvement. For more information about EWI or membership, please visit the chapter web site: ewichattanooga.org.

    Established in 1938, EWI is a non-profit organization with more than 2,500 member firms and 2,800 representatives in major cities throughout the United States and Canada. EWI brings members together to promote member firms, to enhance personal and professional development, and to encourage community involvement. As a premier organization for networking and leadership development for today's business professionals, EWI offers professional development through webinars and its Academy of Leadership, as well as scholarships and philanthropic initiatives with a focus on literacy. For more information, visit ewiconnect.com.

  • Wednesday, November 07, 2012 12:37 PM | Kristina Smith (Administrator)
    Shown, from left to right, first row, Kristina Smith, First Tennessee Bank; Dr. Jim Catanzaro, president of Chattanooga State; Ani Yacoubian, Yacubian Tailors; second row, Sharon Diegel, Miller & MartinPLLC; Margaret Browning, Coca-Cola Bottling Company; third row, Nancy Harrison, Spicer Rudstrom PLLC; Kathy Lee, DiStefano Eye Center; Catherine Cox, Lyndhurst Foundation; fourth row, Lisa Phillips, Chattanooga State; Suzanne Harris, Chattanooga State; and Michelle Withorn, EMJ Construction.

    Executive Women International (EWI) of Chattanooga contributed a $6,000 scholarship to Chattanooga State Community College. Since chartering in 1987, EWI of Chattanooga has contributed more than $170,000 to scholarships at area schools. The scholarships are specially designed for single mothers.

    Local EWI President Ani Yacoubian of Yacoubian Tailors said, “EWI representatives feel fortunate to have made a positive impact on their community through enriching the lives of local women.”

    Established in 1938, EWI is a non-profit organization with more than 2,500 member firms and 2,800 representatives in major cities throughout the United States and Canada. EWI brings members together to promote member firms, enhance personal and professional development, and encourage community involvement. As a premier organization for networking and leadership development for today’s business professionals, EWI offers professional development through webinars and its Academy of Leadership, as well as scholarships and philanthropic initiatives with a focus on literacy.

    Thus, EWI’s tagline, “Connections, Careers and Community,” is fulfilled through the connection and promotion of member companies, career-enhancing professional development and community involvement. For more information about EWI, visit ewiconnect.com. For local member information, visit the chapter website at ewichattanooga.org.

  • Tuesday, November 06, 2012 8:33 PM | Kristina Smith (Administrator)

    Nooga.com  By Staff Report Published Tuesday, November 6th 2012

    The fund was established in memory of Jean Bradford, former executive assistant to the chancellor, who passed away in 1995.

    An additional $6,000 was donated to Chattanooga State Community College.

    “EWI representatives feel fortunate to have made a positive impact on their community through enriching the lives of local women,” Chattanooga chapter President Ani Yacoubain Tailors said in a prepared statement.

    Since chartering in 1987, the Chattanooga chapter of the executive women's group has contributed more than $170,000 to scholarship donations at area schools. The scholarships are specifically designated for single mothers.

          

  • Monday, January 16, 2012 8:24 AM | Kristina Smith (Administrator)
    Since chartering in 1987, the Chattanooga Chapter of Executive Women International (EWI) has contributed more than $150,000 to scholarship donations at University of Tennessee, Chattanooga State and Southern Adventist University.  The scholarships are specifically designated for single mothers earning a bachelor's degree.

    In 2011, EWI of Chattanooga continued a tradition started in 1996, by donating $11,667 to the Jean Bradford Memorial Endowment Fund, established in memory of Jean Bradford, Executive Assistant to UTC Chancellor, Dr. Frederick Obear.  Jean Bradford, an EWI member, passed away in 1995.

    EWI also contributed $5,833 to Chattanooga State, and $2,000 to Southern Adventist University in 2011. The group's members feel fortunate to have made positive impact on their community through enriching the lives of 22 women at UTC, 16 at Chattanooga State, and four at Southern Adventist University.

    For more information about the group or membership, please visit the chapter's web site at : http://ewichattanooga.org.
    ###

    About EWI

    Established in 1938, EWI® is a non-profit organization with more than 2,500 member firms and 2,800 representatives in major cities throughout the United States and Canada. EWI brings members together to promote member firms, to enhance personal and professional development, and to encourage community involvement. As a premier organization for networking and leadership development for today's business professionals, EWI offers professional development through its Academy of Leadership, scholarships, online learning, and philanthropic initiatives with a focus on literacy. For more information, visit ewiconnect.com.

  • Thursday, November 17, 2011 8:23 AM | Anonymous
    Executive Women International (EWI) is pleased to introduce the 2012 Chattanooga Leadership Board, inducted at the chapter's monthly meeting in October.

    The new officers are: President, Michelle Withorn of EMJ Corporation; Vice President / President-Elect, Ani Yacoubian of Yacoubian Tailors; Secretary, Lori Slatton of the Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce; Treasurer, Nena Powell of Lattimore Black Morgan & Cain, PC; Sergeant-at-Arms, Barbara Tawater of Northgate Title Escrow, Inc.; Retention and Recruitment Director, Sandy Saylors of Robert Half International; Professional Development Director, Kate Pinson of CMC Publications; Communications Director, Melissa Gratias of MBG Organizing Solutions; Fundraising Director, Sharon Diegel of Miller & Martin PLLC; and Director at Large / Advisor, Margaret Browning of Coca-Cola Bottling Company United, Inc.

    Michele Withorn expressed her enthusiasm for the coming year – the Chattanooga Chapter's 25th – by introducing a Servant Leadership theme and accompanying strategic plan incorporating the organization's “three C's”: Connections, Careers and Community, allowing each member to participate and grow as an organization and as an individual.

    Goals for this year include highlighting each firm, executive and representative, engaging members through mentoring and increased networking, education on the value of EWI membership and increased community involvement through philanthropy and fundraising.

    According to Michelle, “Servant leaders serve the people they lead, exhibiting selflessness through listening, empathy, awareness and foresight, and by inspiring, empowering, personally investing in and committing to the growth of others and building a healthy community. That's what EWI is all about, and we're excited to be reinforcing these ideals as we celebrate our 25th anniversary!”

    For more information about the group or membership, please visit the chapter's web site at : http://ewichattanooga.org.
    ###

    About EWI

    Established in 1938, EWI® is a non-profit organization with more than 2,500 member firms and 2,800 representatives in major cities throughout the United States and Canada. EWI brings members together to promote member firms, to enhance personal and professional development, and to encourage community involvement. As a premier organization for networking and leadership development for today's business professionals, EWI offers professional development through its Academy of Leadership, scholarships, online learning, and philanthropic initiatives with a focus on literacy. For more information, visit ewiconnect.com.
  • Tuesday, July 05, 2011 10:18 AM | Anonymous
    She never said 'I can't'
    Amanada Ray is a successful young attorney who was a teenage mother at age 14. She put herself through school working full time and part time jobs while raising her son.
    Amanada Ray is a successful young attorney who was a teenage mother at age 14. She put herself through school working full time and part time jobs while raising her son.
    Photo by Tim Barber.

    When Amanda Ray got pregnant at 14, her family wrote her off.

    “I remember one family member, in particular, who said I was going to end up being one of ‘those girls,' with three more children by the time I was 18 and living on welfare. That would be the extent of my life,” said Ray.

    “I came from a very impoverished home that had a lot of negative influences. There was every reason for me not to succeed.”

    But she has.

    At 25, she is a lawyer. She graduated at the top of her high school class, worked two jobs at a time to put herself through college and law school.

    She volunteers her time speaking to young women at Girls Inc. so they'll learn from her experiences.

    “Even though the things I went through are painful, I can't change them. They'll go in vain if I can't share them to help others learn from them,” said the attorney.

    Though the hours she lost in her son's childhood years can't be reclaimed, she knows her perseverance has set an example for him.

    “Hopefully, when he grows up, he'll never think about saying, ‘I can't.' ”

    Q How did you manage caring for an infant and child care while you were in high school and working? (Responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

    A Ray said she got her first job at Krystal undefined working full-time while going to high school. She and her son, Desmond, lived with an aunt in East Chattanooga. Desmond's father was not part of their lives.

    The 16-year-old student would drop Desmond off at day care each weekday, then she'd take three or four hours of morning classes at Middle College High School at Chattanooga State.

    After school, it was off to flip fast food; Desmond would be picked up by a grandmother until Ray came to get him when her shift ended later that night.

    “He was in day care 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. After school, I would go to a second-shift job, so one of his grandparents would keep him until I got off work at 10 or 11 that night.

    “I didn't live in the best part of town. I remember trying to get out of the car carrying a sleeping child, his diaper bag, my book bag, lunchbox and purse undefined and try to get in the house as quickly as possible for safety reasons,” she described.

    “After I got him bathed and in bed, then I'd sit down to study,” she said.

    Her grades never flagged, and she graduated with the distinction of class valedictorian.

    Q When you got your own apartment in college, how did you juggle classes and work to pay your expenses?

    A “I always had to work because I had to maintain a roof over my son's head and keep food in his stomach. So I always had a full-time job and more often than not, another part-time job.

    “While I was in college, I started working at Convergys and Heavenly Wings. Then I worked at Parisian three years. Convergys was always full-time and the other two were part-time. I also worked one semester at SunTrust Bank.”

    Ray said by the time she graduated Middle College High School, she had accumulated 60 college credits, so she entered UTC as a junior. She graduated from UTC in two and a half years.

    Q How could you afford college?

    A “I had a HOPE Scholarship [in addition to working]. I also was given a scholarship by the Executive Women International, the Jean Bradford Memorial Scholarship. It was special. It was an extra dollar amount to pay rent, light bills, books or whatever I needed.”

    Ray was connected with the Executive Women through UTC's Center for Community Career Education.

    According to Sandy Cole, center director, two programs for adults are offered, in addition to several for youth. She said the center assists about 3,200 people a year through its adult and youth programs.

    “Life Planning, our longest program, helps women who become head of household because of death, disablement, separation or divorce.

    “The Education Opportunity Center, which is where Amanda was helped, is a federally funded program that serves adults in eight counties of Tennessee and North Georgia. The sole purpose of EOC is to help adults get into college and to find the money to make that happen,” said C ole.

    Q When did you decide to go to law school?

    A “When I graduated from UTC, I had given up on law school. The people in my family were still saying the same thing: ‘You're smart but not that smart.' Growing up in my household, it was a given you'd graduate from high school, but college was never discussed.

    “I didn't know a lawyer, I couldn't afford to go to law school. I didn't know they had scholarships for law school.”

    Ray said after considering all the hours she had lost with Desmond while pursuing her education, she took a year off from school.

    “That year was solely Desmond's time. He got to play football, I got him through kindergarten. But at some point it hit me that I wanted to go to law school. I started studying for the LSAT and filling out applications.”

    She attended the University of Memphis Law School on a full scholarship.

    Q How did you find child care for Desmond and a place for you in Memphis?

    A “It was very scary. I didn't know a single person. I moved into a very bad part of town and witnessed some horrible things. Part of the time I spent in law school, my son was here living with his grandparents. That gave me time to look at day cares so, when he came back with me, I had a place for him.”

    During law school, Ray interned as a summer clerk with Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel. The law firm made her an offer for employment during her final year at school. She is focusing on construction law and handles some general litigation.

    Contact Susan Pierce at spierce@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6284.


    Chattanooga Times Free Press Article Link
  • Wednesday, November 03, 2010 9:08 AM | Anonymous
    The members of Executive Women International now have approximately $18,000 to use toward scholarships for single mothers earning a bachelor's, master's or associate's degree following the group's 13th annual Barnyard Auction at the Doubletree Hotel downtown, where the organization holds its monthly meetings.

    “It's just women coming together, exchanging ideas and doing things for the community,” said treasurer Kristina Smith, of Ooltewah.

    Scholarships of varying amounts to the University of Tennessee at Chattaooga and Chattanooga State Technical Community College will be awarded in December. Last year eight scholarships were awarded. “A lot of times they're the first person in their family who will go for higher education, and they'll tell their story and there's lots of crying and tears,” said Signal Mountain resident Carolyn Stringer, who joined EWI when the local chapter was chartered in 1987. Since chartering, the local chapter has disbursed more than $130,000 in scholarships. “It's an easy sell for me. I believe in it because we promote the company,” said Stringer, who has won the membership drive three years in a row. She said she'll pitch EWI in the elevator or walking down the street. “We promote the business. We promote professionally the person who is the representative,” she said.

    Appointed representatives to the non-competitive organization range from clerks to small-business owners to CEOs, who can all earn continuing education credits at the Leadership Conference and Annual Meeting and the Academy of Leadership courses. “When you tell people that they say, ‘Oh, wow. That's wonderful.' And it really is,” Stringer said.  “So many people say, ‘I can hear the enthusiasm in your voice when you talk about it.'”

    EWI also holds Reading Rallies at area schools once a year to help boost local literacy. “It is so awesome,” said Kathy Lee, of Ooltewah. “We just read stories to try to help students learn. They're just so sweet.” One EWI member dressed up like a tooth reads about brushing teeth. Another dressed like a duck discusses litter and recycling, and the Tennessee Aquarium brings animals, like snakes and turtles, to talk about their habitats.

    EWI meets the second Tuesday of the month for dinner at the Doubletree. Monthly projects have included book drives, care packages for troops and fundraisers for local women's shelters. Featured speakers have included 11-time Pro Bowl selection Anthony Munoz of the Cincinnati Bengals. “There's always some kind of cause that we're bringing something a little extra for each month,” Lee said.
  • Friday, October 22, 2010 9:06 AM | Anonymous
    Families are invited to help the Mayor decorate a holiday tree with items of warmth they bring to be donated to the Salvation Army

    WHAT: To unveil the “Share the Warmth Tree,” a 9-foot tall holiday tree will be decorated with mittens, scarves, hats, gloves and blankets; this effort also launches Creative Discovery Museum's holiday exhibit, “Helping Hands,” which introduces children to the important idea that everyone – including children – can help other people.

    WHEN: Saturday, Nov. 20 at 11 a.m.

    WHERE: Creative Discovery Museum
    321 Chestnut St. 37402

    WHO: Chattanooga Mayor Ron Littlefield; Representatives from Executive Women International, who are a co-sponsor of the tree; Executive Director of Creative Discovery Museum Henry Schulson; and Director of Community Relations and Development for the Salvation Army Kimberly George, will be present.

    WHY: Creative Discovery Museum is providing a drop-off point for donations that help needy people keep warm. The Tree of Warmth reflects the message of the Museum's “Helping Hands” exhibit, which opens Saturday, Nov. 20, and helps children learn about giving in their community and around the world.

    For museum operation hours or further information: 756-2738 or www.cdmfun.org

EWI of Chattanooga | P.O. Box 11522 | Chattanooga, TN  37401 | Contact
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